Adequate Hydrocortison Supplementation

The past ten days have been a wonderful, wonderful ride. I’m alive again!

I’ve upped my Hydrocortison daily dose from 20 mg to 35 mg.  It may sound like a lot but actually it isn’t. Anywhere between 20 and 50 mg per day can be normal for an individual. 35 mg seems to be my sweet spot. I can feel when it’s too much or not enough. Very interesting experience!

I also learned how to spread the dose throughout the day in a more physiological way (take 2/3rds of the dose before noon, take it in increments of 5 and 10 mgs)

Alive again! I’ve got energy! I’ve got stamina! I’ve been doing things I haven’t done since 2008. Things like taking a shower before bed. Just because I felt like it and wanted to feel the warmth of the water. I could never do that because it would affect homeostasis badly. I had to plan my showers. Each day I could chose to either take a shower or cook dinner. Couldn’t do both.
Now I can :)

I’ve taken walks into the city. I’ve started to do a little bit of exercising. One morning I just took the car and drove to my friend, just to have tea with her and eat all her chocolates, and then I drove back home and did some other things for the rest of the day. Without crashing.

Reverse Therapy is a tremendous help in keeping things fun. Doing things because I want to do them, not because I can do them.

Suddenly giving my body the hormone it lacks has affected other hormones. I’ve noticed changes in Thyroid hormones, Testosteron, Estrogens and Progesteron. Insulin too, probably.

I have the good sense to do HRT on a dose that doesn’t exceed normal daily production so any effects I have filter out of the system within a day. It’s interesting how I can influence it though. With food, with Progesteron cream, with calming the nervous system.

Today my medical tags arrived. I’m going to wear one of these whenever I leave the house and am in risk of getting in an accident or experiencing dehydration.
Untitled
I may order some new ones, with less info on the front but more readible. These tags are quite small in reality. I doubt anyone who finds me collapsed in the street will notice. And/or has her reading glasses nearby to read the information ;)

  • I will wear it with a white band with red crosses on it. I’m thinking of embroidering them myself. I could also learn bandweven…
  • I will wear these “upside down”, not in the way that I can read it but in the way that anybody grabbing my hand can read it. Seems more sensible.

I ordered these medical information tags from a wonderful company here in Holland: Healthband. They are very good, fast and reliable. They keep an eye out for optimum spelling and lay-out of the text and won’t start engraving until you give the final consent. Really good costumer service!

It’s a woman and husband company. She’s a diabetic and wears one of these herself. They noticed we lack a good supplier in the Netherlands for sport id tags and medical id and sos tags.

The tags themselves are good too. No sharp edges and quality engraved.

I chose to direct my information towards courages passers-by who find me collapsed or delirious from dehydration. I don’t dazzle them with the medical info, that’s all on the back. I try and tell them exactly what to do:

  1. feed me my pills. They’re in my bra. Do it! I’m in danger for my life.
  2. call the emergency services and say this: “adrenal crisis!”
  3. say the name and dose of the solution of injectable cortisol I need. I want the medical personal to know.

 

The hydrocortison is wonderful :)
I no longer need a wheel barrow to be carried around in to enjoy life:

It may still be a honeymoon period. I’m still figuring out a lot of things, for example this morning I woke up a zombie, I have difficulty getting things right through the night when I’ve had my insomnia again.

Insomnia!
Now I know for sure! When I/you wake up at 3 AM and are wide awake for 1,5 hors, that’s a cortisol surge. It is!
I can now reproduce it. It feels exactly the same.

The insomnia I have had my whole life is that: a cortisol surge at 3 AM. Puzzle solved!
Now onto the next: what causes this surge? That’s one of the queries I’m on now. That and the relation between homocysteine and my weird (scary) heart rhythms that I have since 15 months. Because I’m still doing the mB12 thing, now combined with Phosphadytil-serine which drives another keg in the same methylation system. My GP put me onto this.

It causes mild brain storms, literally. But luckily I can move more easily now and movement is marvellous for levelling hormones and weird brain chemistry. So, I’m off for a little walk now. It’s beautiful weather outside here.
Untitled

Reverse Therapy: recovering from ME/CFS

Had my first session last week, a Skype session with therapist Lyn White in the UK. This works.
It’s the way to keep the body (autonomic nervous system) out of Fight or Flight. I’m no longer wired. Instead I’m relaxed, chill, happy. Without pain, without tiredness.

I’ve just spend four days on a road trip and a midwinter wool fair. First day I drove for hours and hours. Second day I stood on my feet in a wool booth and talked to people for 7 hours. Third day the same. Fourth day drove back. All the time was spend with a friend, I was seldom alone.

No crash, no pain. No worries, no strain.
This is unheard of.

I did have my usual insomnia (and then some due to mosquito bites) in the night but I performed wonderful all of the days nonetheless.
I was not overly sensitive to noises, smells or the presence of my friend.

Back home there has been no crash. There was tiredness, of course. There were bouts of head aches because of all the impressions and things I’d seen. A bit of a hoarse throat because of the unusual amounts of talking. My feet tingled.
But I’ve been so cheerful all these days! And the days after, here, back home.

Reverse Therapy and Mickel Therapy are what works for me.

I’m not going to talk about their medical opinions about what ME is. Just know that both therapies give a tool box to keep the nervous system calm.
And whatever their, mine or your own theory is about the relation between nervous system and ME/CFS, keeping the former calm helps to alleviate symptoms of the latter.

I am VERY GLAD to be back in the calm again. I had lost it when life stresses hit us in January/February of this year.
(I had found it in the course of the years I spend at the cabin, alone. Well fed, warm and finally without that stupid ambition. Once I did Gupta Amygdala Retraining I was without symptoms too but the calmness hadn’t ingrained. With Reverse Therapy it has.)

For the past few months I tried DIY Reverse Therapy, having read all the things that have been written about it and understanding its principles and its ideas. But it was not the right way. Having a coach is much more efficient. Because my twittering brain is always trying to keep on top of things it kept getting in the way of actually applying Reverse Therapy. A chatterbox in the head is precisely the thing the nervous system doesn’t need.

Long story short: a whole new world has opened up to me. I’m calm and am experiencing bouts of happyness from the very core of my bones. Symptoms are dwindling. I’m without worries. I had a wonderful weekend with my friend.
I’ve started dreaming about (and planning) holidays.

Reverse Therapy and Mickel Therapy are precisely the thing I need. On top of all the other things I’ve learned to do over the years to support my body:
– take vitamin D because of where I live on the globe
– take extra vit D because my receptors are wonky
– dabble in mB12
– keep levels up from minerals Zinc, Lithium, Magnesium, Molybdenum, Selenium and Iodium
– avoid cruciferous vegetables (onions, kale, garlic etc.)
– supplement hormones I lack (Progesteron, Cortisol)(all body identical in physiological doses)
– supplement Progesteron to counter Estrogen highs during the cycle
– avoid blood sugar spikes and stress and practise sleep (restriction) therapy to sleep through the night
– avoid foods difficult to digest (boiled egg whites, raw food, nuts, leafy vegetables)
– avoid foods that “feel bad” (vegetable oils, caffeine, sugars, fried foods, vanillin, commercial chicken and vegetables that never saw soil or sunlight)
– avoid tiresome people or learn how to deal with them without investing energy
– rest flat for one hour, one hour after the last bite
– eat small portions
– aid the acidity of the stomach with HCL
– aid the lymphatic system with stretching, yawning and lots of full fats (butter, coconut fat, fatty animal tissue)
– keep the nervous system relaxed (Reverse Therapy, doing fun things, be cheerful, having cups of tea, dancing in the living room, cuddling the cats)

What else?
With the cortisol pills and the managing of my own stress levels I can tune the immune system a bit and have it be extra vigilant at times when I’m surrounded by lots of “germy people”.
I have gotten only one cold since I fell ill in 2008. And that cold was when I was severely stressed because I wanted to go on a cross-Europe train tour. Extra stress = extra cortisol = suppressing of the immune system = invitation to opportunistic viruses and bacteria.

And finally: I’m a firm believer of practising Mental Hygiene. You are not obliged to think what you think. If what I think makes me feel bad (worry, disaster scenario, reliving bad memories, focusing on bad aspects) I can and I should correct myself.
Think of something else. Anything else. Think of ants. Think of blue things. Think of the fun thing that happened the other day. Go watch David Armand mime the lyrics of Queen’s Don’t Stop Me Now.
There is no thought police in my head, I am free to think about something else.

 

PS I’m listening to a Norwegian podcast. For the first time since I fell ill. I can now listen to Norwegian again without feeling sad :)

As a result I’ve just started thinking about visiting that country again too. I can’t say this feeling will stay. I can’t yet claim I am in recovery. But I sure am happy and healthy, right this minute.